Sunday, July 9, 2017

Old Medical Photos From The Late 1800's & The Early 1900's.


---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Nihal Gooneratne
Date: Mon, Jul 10, 2017 at 2:13 AM
Subject: A walk down a Doctor's Memory Lane
To: Nihal Gooneratne



A walk down Memory Lane

1. Before anaesthetics, all you got for surgery was a little ether.
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2. Before advanced medication, mental institutions wrapped patients in wet sheets to subdue them.
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3. Nothing cures the common cold like a little radioactive water.
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4. Physiotherapy was pretty weird back then.
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5. Prosthetic limbs sure have come a long way.
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6. As have radiology nurse uniforms.
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7. This was what a defibrillator looked like back then.
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8. Wheelchair design was still in its infancy.
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9 Treating infants for rickets was an exercise in mad science.
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10. Before doctors were allowed  to touch female patients, women had to use
anatomical models to describe their symptoms.
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11. This old blood transfusion machine looks like a modern day third grader's science project.
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12. After seeing this "birthing chair" you can understand why home births stayed popular.
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13. I'd take a plain old peg leg over this contraption.
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14. This probably isn't the best way to treat scoliosis.
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15. This is how they used to solve your back problems.
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I used to be afraid of going to the doctor, but after looking at these,
a little needle prick and a tongue depressor doesn't seem that bad.
At the very least, I won't leave with a prescription for radioactive water.
BEH180617










--
Philip Veerasingam

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